©bigjettardis



posted 2 hours ago






postapocalypsepunk:

the-telesterion:

"Persephone" by Lyrota

I reblogged this like two days ago but I want it on my blog again. 


posted 5 hours ago






whatdiscworldtaughtme:

642. One of the signs of real royalty is not having any money. || 'Pyramids'

whatdiscworldtaughtme:

642. One of the signs of real royalty is not having any money. || 'Pyramids'






everytime I think about the witches of tumblr I just imagine

msarano:

image

This is completely accurate in my case:

See? I keep the laptop on the book to give the laptop more airflow and reduce overheating (and for easy access). And yeah, this is an everyday thing although the books change fairly often.






"I always surprise myself on my ability to turn a phrase. Words are, in my not so humble opinion, the most inexhaustible source of magic; capable of both inflicting injury and remedying it."

J. K. Rowling (via victoriousvocabulary)

posted 17 hours ago






amigurumipatterns:

Paul is reading about his close family in the big book of mushrooms.

Amigurumi pattern for Paul the toadstool


posted 20 hours ago






beewitch:

Yep… This is me.






starshine-landfill:

buddhistmamaduck:

allthecolorsofdisney:

” Sophie , you’re beautiful! “

          

In the book, Sophie possess a certain kind of magical power - she makes things real by saying them. She can lay spells just by saying them. When she made hats, and she told a hat that it would make a rich young man fall in love with it, a rich young man fell in love with the woman who bought it. When she told a hat it would make some woman look beautiful, everyone knew the mayor’s wife looked positively radiant in it. It’s what drew the Witch to her hat shop in the first place.  When she cursed out a bucket of plant food, it turned to potent weed killer. When she told herself she might as well be an old woman, when she told herself she was doomed to fail, when she told herself she was plain and boring and no one would ever notice her, no one did.

When Howl tried to break the spell on Sophie, and he tried many times, he always failed. Not because his magic was less powerful than the Witch’s, but because it was less powerful than Sophie’s.

One of my all time favorite books/movies in the world!






ancientart:

Hellenistic gold wreath, dates to about 350-300 BC, from the Dardanelles, modern Turkey. GR 1908.4-14.1.
Two cicadas and a bee nestle among the oak-leaves

This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.
Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.
Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold wreaths were left as dedications. The dedicators might be individuals (including men, women, foreigners or officials at the end of a term of office), or states or foreign powers.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Sam Teigen.

ancientart:

Hellenistic gold wreath, dates to about 350-300 BC, from the Dardanelles, modern Turkey. GR 1908.4-14.1.

Two cicadas and a bee nestle among the oak-leaves

This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.

Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.

Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold wreaths were left as dedications. The dedicators might be individuals (including men, women, foreigners or officials at the end of a term of office), or states or foreign powers.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Sam Teigen.


source:ancientart
posted 1 day ago











"Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality."






brynja-storm:

alantyson:

Actually really good career advice from a laughing homicidal madman.

SO DON’T BITCH WHEN WITCHES CHARGE FOR SERVICES.






“All the other fairies fly, why don’t you?”
“I had wings once. They were strong. They were stolen from me.






"You can tell how dangerous a person is by the way they hold their anger inside themselves quietly."


posted 1 day ago






evilsupplyco:

Whisper your name into a dark room. If you hear your own voice respond, run.


posted 2 days ago